Question: What Are The 3 Universal Precautions?

How can nurses prevent the spread of infection?

Clinical care nurses directly prevent infections by performing, monitoring, and assuring compliance with aseptic work practices; providing knowledgeable collaborative oversight on environmental decontamination to prevent transmission of microorganisms from patient to patient; and serve as the primary resource to ….

What are the 5 universal precautions?

5 Steps of Universal PrecautionsEducation.Hand washing.Use of protective barriers (Personal Protective Equipment (PPE))Cleaning of contaminated surfaces.Safe handling/disposal of contaminated material.

What are the 10 standard precautions?

Standard PrecautionsHand hygiene.Use of personal protective equipment (e.g., gloves, masks, eyewear).Respiratory hygiene / cough etiquette.Sharps safety (engineering and work practice controls).Safe injection practices (i.e., aseptic technique for parenteral medications).Sterile instruments and devices.More items…

What are the 5 basic principles of infection control?

Introduction.The general principles of infection prevention and control.Hand hygiene.Using personal protective equipment.Safe handling and disposal of sharps.Safe handling and disposal of chemical waste.Managing blood and bodily fluids.

What PPE is used for standard precautions?

Standard precautions consist of the following practices: hand hygiene before and after all patient contact. the use of personal protective equipment, which may include gloves, impermeable gowns, plastic aprons, masks, face shields and eye protection. the safe use and disposal of sharps.

What is the most common method of spreading infection?

Contact transmission is the most common form of transmitting diseases and virus. There are two types of contact transmission: direct and indirect. Direct contact transmission occurs when there is physical contact between an infected person and a susceptible person.

Who developed universal precautions?

Following the AIDS outbreak in the 1980s the US CDC formally introduced them in 1985–88. Every patient was treated as if infected and therefore precautions were taken to minimize risk. In 1987, the practice of universal precautions was adjusted by a set of rules known as body substance isolation.

What are standard precautions and when should they be used?

Standard precautions are a set of infection control practices used to prevent transmission of diseases that can be acquired by contact with blood, body fluids, non-intact skin (including rashes), and mucous membranes.

What are the 3 universal safety precautions?

Universal PrecautionsUse barrier protection at all times.Use gloves for protection when working with or around blood and body fluids.Change glove between patients.Use glasses, goggles, masks, shields, and waterproof gowns/aprons to protect face from splashes.Wash hands if contaminated and after removing gloves.More items…

What are examples of universal precautions?

Universal precautions include: Using disposable gloves and other protective barriers while examining all patients and while handling needles, scalpels, and other sharp instruments. Washing hands and other skin surfaces that are contaminated with blood or body fluids immediately after a procedure or examination.

What are 3 universal precautions when dealing with body fluids?

Blood and body fluid precautions involve the use of protective barriers such as gloves, gowns, masks, and eye protection. These reduce the risk of exposing the skin or mucous membranes to potentially infectious fluids.

What is the difference between standard and universal precautions?

In 1996, the CDC expanded the concept and changed the term to standard precautions, which integrated and expanded the elements of universal precautions to include contact with all body fluids (except sweat), regardless of whether blood is present.

What diseases are airborne precautions?

Diseases requiring airborne precautions include, but are not limited to: Measles, Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS), Varicella (chickenpox), and Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Airborne precautions apply to patients known or suspected to be infected with microorganisms transmitted by airborne droplet nuclei.

Why is standard precautions important?

Standard precautions are meant to reduce the risk of transmission of bloodborne and other pathogens from both recognized and unrecognized sources. They are the basic level of infection control precautions which are to be used, as a minimum, in the care of all patients.

What are additional precautions and when should they be used?

Additional Precautions are based on the mode of transmission of the causative organism. Additional Precautions are used as an adjunct to Routine Practices when microorganisms are: Highly infectious • Known to create severe disease • Difficult to treat (antibiotic resistant).

What are the 4 main universal precautions?

Standard Precautions apply to 1) blood; 2) all body fluids, secretions, and excretions, except sweat, regardless of whether or not they contain visible blood; 3) non-intact skin; and 4) mucous membranes.

What do universal precautions include?

Universal precautions include vigorously washing hands before and after exposure to blood and other body fluids. Healthcare providers should also always wear gloves, masks, goggles, other personal protective equipment (PPE) and use work practice controls to limit exposure to potential bloodborne pathogens.