Question: What Happens In A Diabetic Eye Test?

Can diabetes cause eye problems?

Diabetic retinopathy (die-uh-BET-ik ret-ih-NOP-uh-thee) is a diabetes complication that affects eyes.

It’s caused by damage to the blood vessels of the light-sensitive tissue at the back of the eye (retina).

At first, diabetic retinopathy may cause no symptoms or only mild vision problems..

What happens in a diabetic eye screening?

You go for diabetic eye screening in your GP practice, at a hospital or at a clinic. They use a camera to take photographs of your eyes. The test takes about 15 minutes. If you’re aged over 50, you might need eye drops to dilate your pupils.

What is a diabetic eye test?

Diabetic eye screening is a test to check for eye problems caused by diabetes. Eye problems caused by diabetes are called diabetic retinopathy. This can lead to sight loss if it’s not found early. The eye screening test can find problems before they affect your sight.

Do diabetics pay for eye tests?

Diabetes is known to affect the eyes and so all people diagnosed with diabetes are eligible for free sight tests on the NHS. You may need to bring proof that you are eligible for a free eye test. Proof you have diabetes can include a repeat prescription card or an out-patient appointment card.

How do you test for diabetic retinopathy?

The only way to diagnose diabetic retinopathy is to have a dilated eye exam. For this test, your ophthalmologist will place drops in your eyes to widen, or dilate, your pupils. Dilating your pupils helps your doctor to see inside your eyes more easily and inspect for damage caused by retinopathy.

How long does it take to go blind from diabetes?

Diabetic retinopathy is a complication of diabetes, caused by high blood sugar levels damaging the back of the eye (retina). It can cause blindness if left undiagnosed and untreated. However, it usually takes several years for diabetic retinopathy to reach a stage where it could threaten your sight.